Chocolate Peanut Butter Cream Pie


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Ever since debuting my Peanut Butter Cream Pie with my friends over a year ago, I’ve been dying to try the chocolate version, as recommended by my friend Manny – another Foodie.

ingredients.

  • 1 Perfect Homemade Pie Crust
  • 3 1/2 c. half-and-half
  • 8 T. butter, cut into chunks
  • 2/3 c. sugar
  • 1/4 c. cornstarch
  • 9 egg yolks
  • 1 c. semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1/2 c. bittersweet chocolate chips or pieces
  • 1 1/2 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 c. heavy cream
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 4 T. sugar
  • 1 to 1 1/2 c. powdered sugar
  • ½ c. peanut butter (I prefer creamy)

directions.

  1. Mix cornstarch, sugar, and eggs yolks in a medium-sized bowl with a wire whisk until smooth. Set mixture aside. Heat cream until hot to the touch. Very slowly pour the hot cream in a thin stream into the egg yolk mixture, stirring as you pour. Blend until incorporated.
  2. Return mixture to the stove top and cook till thickened over medium heat (about two to four minutes). Remove from heat. Add butter and chocolate chips and stir until ingredients are well blended. Add vanilla. Chill.
  3. Prepare your peanut butter crumble by mixing 1/2 cup peanut butter with 1 to 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar until small crumbs form. (Add more powdered sugar if you’re not getting crumbs.)
  4. Place 1/3 of the crumbs into the cooled pie shell. Spoon chilled pudding on top of crumbs. Place 1/3 crumbs on top of pudding. Top pudding with two cups of freshly beaten whipped cream.
  5. To prepare whip cream, beat cream on high using a chilled bowl and chilled beaters. Beat with 4 tablespoons of sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract until soft peaks form. Do not beat too long or the cream will turn into butter.
  6. Garnish whipped cream with remaining peanut butter crumbs.

A dense, chocolatey, peanut buttery cream pie. The perfect taste and combination. This is an extremely rich, decadent dessert.

Recipe rating:

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Liz MacDonald says:

    Hey thats sounds amazing I cant wait to make it! Just wondering two things tho, first whats half and half? (3 and half cups but I dunno what it is) also do you know the measurements in grams at all? Im in England and never know how much a cup is meant to be! Thanks

    Like

    1. lefoodsnob says:

      Hi Liz!

      Good questions. You’re not the first person to ask me what half and half is.

      Definition: Half and Half is a dairy product consisting of half light cream and half milk.

      So I did some research on what’s comparable to half and half in the UK, and the answer is half cream. I’ve read half cream is somewhat uncommon. So for a half and half substitute, it would be easy to mix light cream with milk to form half-and-half. If you don’t have light cream (it’s not readily available in the U.S.), I would suggest using cream or single cream and mixing with milk (equal parts).

      As for measuring equivalents, here are some general equivalents (keep in mind that I designate the tablespoon measurement as a ‘T.’ in my recipes as opposed to ‘tbsp.’

      Spoons
      British = American
      1 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon
      1 tablespoon = 1 tablespoon
      2 tablespoons = 3 tablespoons
      3.5 tablespoons = 4 tablespoons
      4 tablespoons = 5 tablespoons

      Solid measures
      Using the one-cup standard measure as sold in the UK
      British = American
      1lb (450g) butter or margarine = 2 cups (or four sticks).
      1lb (450g) flour = 4 cups.
      1lb 450 g, granulated or caster, (superfine), sugar = 2 cups.
      1lb 450 g, icing sugar (confectioners’ sugar) = 3 cups
      4 oz, 110 g, icing sugar, (confectioner’s sugar), = half a cup plus a heaped tbsp.
      8 oz, 225 g, flour = 2 cups.4 oz,
      110 g, flour, = 1 cup.8 oz,
      8 oz, 225 g, butter, margarine, or shortening = one cup (or two sticks).
      4 oz, 110 g, butter, margarine, or shortening = half a cup (or one stick).
      2 oz, 50 g, butter, margarine or shortening = a quarter of a cup (or half a stick).
      8 oz, 225 g, brown sugar = 1 cup.
      4 oz, 110 g, brown sugar = half a cup
      3 oz, 75 g, plain, (semi-sweet) chocolate, broken into squares = 3-quarters of a cup.

      Useful teaspoon measures.
      1 oz, 25 g, is one heaped or heaping, tbsp of flour, oatmeal, cheese, breadcrumbs, or icing, confectioners grade, sugar.
      1 oz, 25 g, is 1 rounded tbsp, of granulated or caster, superfine, sugar.
      1 oz, 25 g, is 2 level tbsp of butter, margarine or shortening.

      Liquid Measures
      British = American
      half a tsp, 2.5 ml. = half a tsp,
      2.5 ml.1 tsp, 5 ml. = 1 tsp,
      5 ml.1 average tbsp,
      15 ml. = 1 average tbsp,
      15 ml.A quarter of a pint,
      150 ml. = Two thirds of a cup.
      120 ml, 4 fl.oz, = half a cup.
      Half a pint, 275 ml,
      8 fl.oz, = A generous 1 cup.
      Three-quarters of a pint, 425 ml. = Two cups
      1 pint, 570 ml. = Two and a half cups.
      One and a half pints, approx. 840 ml. = Three and three-quarter cups.
      1 and 3-quarter pints, 1 litre, = 4 and a half cups.
      2 pints = 5 cups.

      Here is the conversion for this specific recipe (you may want to double check this!):

      1 Perfect Homemade Pie Crust (or any precooked pie crust)
      829.5 ml half-and-half (half cream)
      113 g. butter, cut into chunks
      132 g. sugar
      31 g. cornstarch (cornflour)
      9 egg yolks
      approximately 155 g. dark or plain chocolate chips
      approximately 78 g. high-quality plain chocolate chips or pieces
      7 ml. vanilla extract
      474 ml. double cream
      5 ml. vanilla extract
      56.7 g. sugar
      113 to 169.5 g. powdered sugar (icing sugar)
      160 g. peanut butter

      Like

      1. Liz MacDonald says:

        Awesome! Thanks! Can’t wait to get in the kitchen now, after a trip to the supermarket lol

        Like

      2. lefoodsnob says:

        No problem, Liz. 🙂 Please let me know how it turns out!

        Like

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