Roasted Pork Butt


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Early Sunday morning I described to the butcher at the New Seasons down the street from my house what kind of meat I was looking for as I didn’t see it in the display case. His reply? Oh you’re looking for pork butt. The look on my face begged to differ, I’m sure. I was not looking for pork butt! Then he explained that bone-in pork shoulder is more commonly known as pork butt. I still thought he was trying to pull a fast one on me.

Twenty-five dollars later, I walked out of the store with a six pound (plus some!) bone-in pork shoulder. Or pork butt, as the butcher would say. The thing was freaking huge. I had no idea what kind of undertaking I was getting myself into. Further I still don’t have any clue who on earth is going to help me eat all this pork. Sis is usually reluctant to eat most of what I make, though before I even bought the pork butt she did say she would eat some of it. That was before I knew exactly how much butt I would be making.

This recipe is courtesy of Grandma Mo (and adapted from one she found in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel).

ingredients.

directions.

  1. Place pork in a large roasting pan fat side up. With a sharp knife, score the skin and fat down to the surface of the pork. Make slices ¾ inch apart, then score across the slices at a 45 degree angle.
  2. Rub Garlic and Herb Rub  into the scores and over all surfaces; most of the paste should be trapped in the scored skin and fat; refrigerate at least three hours or overnight.81C2929B-7A25-4B09-A81F-C33A842045E2.jpeg
  3. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  4. Place pork in oven and roast about four hours or until the internal temperature reaches 160 F. The longer you keep the roast in the oven the more tender the meat will be.A9CAFE1B-9EEE-442C-9506-B83E270A85D2.jpeg
  5. Let pork cool slightly and then chop or tear into large chunks.
  6. Serves 12.

After smelling this roast for four hours, I couldn’t wait for it to cool before I tried it. Neither could Sis. The flavor was amazing. As good as it smelled. We can’t wait to eat it in quesadillas, tacos, barbecue sauce and more.

Recipe rating: 

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